The recovery of light hydrocarbons refers to the removal of ethane, propane, butane and heavier hydrocarbons from the gas stream. Natural gas liquids (NGL) is the general term for liquids extracted from the natural gas stream (ethane and heavier products) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is the term used to refer to extracted liquids where the main components are propane, n-butane and iso-butane. Depending on the requirement, hydrocarbon dew point control packages or cryogenic plants can be used to extract NGL from gas streams. To extract individual components from the NGL, fractionation will typically be required.

  • Hydrocarbon Dew Point Control
  • Cryogenic Plants
  • Natural Gas Liquids
  • liquefied Petroleum Gas
hydrocarbon recovery solutions


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Hydrocarbon Dew Point Control

Hydrocarbon Dew Point Control

EnerProcess' engieering team has extensive process design and modular engineering experience, building and delivering oil & gas processing and treating facilities. We excel in both pre engineered and custom designed solutions using open art technology and proprietary designs. When combined with EnerProcess’s broad family of midstream products and in house engineering services, you can count on us to deliver a profitable project time after time.

Hydrocarbon dew point refers to the temperature at any pressure range or the pressure at any temperature range where hydrocarbons begin to condense from the gas mixture. At the same temperature, heavier hydrocarbons’ dew point temperature increases as the pressure is reduced. Hydrocarbon dew point control (HCDPC) can be used for the extraction of NGL from gas streams. Depending on the product requirements and the gas stream specifications, EnerProcess provides customized HCDPC packages to meet our customer's’ requirements.

Cryogenic Plants

Cryogenic Plants

A cryogenic processing plant is a facility where natural gas flowing from wells is cooled to sub-zero temperatures in order to condense liquids or NGLs (natural gas liquids). These can include butane, ethane and propane. NGLs are shipped to market and often used in refineries and petrochemical plants for fuel or feedstock. The methane gas that remains after removing liquids is transported via pipeline to where it is needed.

Typically a plant separates NGLs from natural gas by chilling the gas stream down to around -120 degrees Fahrenheit. This allows a blended liquid hydrocarbon feedstock to be collected which then is fed into a fractionation plant that finishes processing the liquid hydrocarbon or Y Grade into high purity propane, butane and natural gasoline.

  • 90%+ ethane recovery
  • 99.9% propane and heavier recovery
  • Capable with efficient Ethane rejection mode
  • Designed with maximum turndown operation
  • Fast-track design available upon request
  • Skid-mounted for simple installation and mobility
EnerProcess custom cryogenic plants are designed to recover ethane from the natural gas stream with virtually no loss of propane and heavier components. Cryogenic plants do so by chilling the feed gas via turbo expansion to significantly lower temperatures possible with standard refrigeration plants. With a modular design that allows for faster deliverability and makes hookup and field construction easier, our plants are built to meet our clients' desired conditions. Each cryogenic plant is designed to operate in ethane rejection mode while retaining maximum propane recoveries. EnerProcess specializes in smaller to midsize cryogenic applications, yet all designs are fully scalable in size.

Natural Gas Liquids

Natural Gas Liquids

Natural gas liquids (NGLs) are hydrocarbons—in the same family of molecules as natural gas and crude oil, composed exclusively of carbon and hydrogen. Ethane, propane, butane, isobutane, and pentane are all NGLs. There are many uses for NGLs, spanning nearly all sectors of the economy. NGLs are used as inputs for petrochemical plants, burned for space heat and cooking, and blended into vehicle fuel. Higher crude oil prices have contributed to increased NGL prices and, in turn, provided incentives to drill in liquids-rich resources with significant NGL content. The chemical composition of these hydrocarbons is similar, yet their applications vary widely. Ethane occupies the largest share of NGL field production. It is used almost exclusively to produce ethylene, which is then turned into plastics. Much of the propane, by contrast, is burned for heating, although a substantial amount is used as petrochemical feedstock. A blend of propane and butane, sometimes referred to as "autogas," is a popular fuel in some parts of Europe, Turkey, and Australia. Natural gasoline (pentanes plus) can be blended into various kinds of fuel for combustion engines, and is useful in energy recovery from wells and oil sands.
Liquefied Petroleum Gas

Liquefied Petroleum Gas

LPG consists mainly of propane (C3) and butane (C4) and is widely used as an alternative automotive fuel or as chemical feedstock. For the recovery of LPG, we offer an advanced expander process using cryogenic absorption and a de-ethaniser column, which allows for recovery rates as high as 99.9 %, while minimising energy consumption. The expander process enables higher CO2 content in the feed gas than conventional expander processes. LPG can be fractionated, stored in tanks and loaded for export in the same manner as NGL.